Tag Archives: Democratic Party

Hillary’s Campaign Speaks – Red Translates

Red got this message from the Hillary Clinton campaign yesterday.  As always, Red translates so that you don’t have to.

It seems the Sanders campaign is finally seeing the writing on the wall (and it says Victory): Hillary has won more votes  AND more pledged delegates (if you include all the Democratic Party suck-ups disguised as so-called “Super-Delegates”) in this election — her lead in both is nearly insurmountable (nearly, but not actually).

So this morning, Bernie’s campaign manager claimed the convention could be an “open convention,” (the horror!!) and declared they’re going to try and flip delegates’ votes (the double horror!!), overturning the will of the voters (unless of course you are talking about the SD’s who don’t represent the will of anything except the Clinton machine).

Your vote is your voice (but really we all know money talks and that’s why you are getting this email and we are changing the font just in case), and the Sanders campaign (those Commies) shouldn’t be trying to circumvent the process (by attempting to win) — or the nearly 9 million (and counting) people who have made their voice heard for Hillary in this election (just ignore the voices of the millions who have voted for Bernie – they’ll eventually get hoarse and go away).

We need to head into our next contests stronger than ever (oops – Wisconsin) so that we can widen our delegate lead (twist more SD arms), widen our vote lead, and secure this nomination (wrap up more SD’s) long before we get to the convention (let’s leave that mess to the GOP)– can you chip(again “money talks” blah, blah, blah) in to help Hillary win key states like New York and Pennsylvania (really, she’s worried about New York?)? When you do, we’ll send you a free sticker (Red has always dreamed of having a free Hillary Thank You Sticker – it would complete him) to say thank you!

 

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Today in Texas History – July 22

From the Annals of Discrimination – In 1944, Lawrence Aaron Nixon, black physician and voting-rights advocate, was given a ballot to vote in the Democratic Party primary.  In that day, the Democratic nominee was all but assured of election and thus, the Democratic primary was the “real” election.  Nixon had become involved in the civil rights movement after seeing the disgusting number of lynchings of black men in Texas, one of which occurred in Cameron where Nixon was practicing at the time.   He moved to El Paso, established a successful medical practice, helped organize a Methodist congregation, voted in Democratic primary and general elections, and in 1914 helped to organize the local chapter of the NAACP.  But in 1923 the Texas legislature passed a law prohibiting blacks from voting in Democratic primaries. In 1924, with the sponsorship of the NAACP, Nixon took his poll-tax receipt to a Democratic primary polling place and was refused a ballot. This began a twenty-year legal fight.  Nixon and his attorney, Fred C. Knollenberg, twice prevailed at the U.S. Supreme Court in their quest to secure voting rights for blacks. The Nixon decisions were major steps toward voting rights, but Texas and the dominant Democratic Party employed a number of legal maneuvers to continue to deny primary votes to blacks.  Only after the decision in Smith v. Allwright ended the white primary system, did blacks have a clear right to vote.

Photo from http://www.blackpast.org

Bernie Comes Calling in Texas

Sen. Bernie Sanders brought his upstart campaign to Texas this weekend.  Rallies in Dallas and Houston had to be moved to larger sites to accommodate crowds not normally seen for Democratic candidates in Texas.  Sanders told the crowds that he is not conceding any state.  The Texas Tribune reports on Sanders’s speech.

One of the problems that exists in American politics today, in my view, is that the Democratic Party has conceded half of the states in the country at the national level, and that’s wrong,” Sanders, a Vermont Independent running as a Democrat, said during a rally at a downtown Dallas hotel.

Several hours later at a similar event in Houston, he sharpened his advice for Democrats, saying the “simple truth is that you cannot be a national political party which claims to represent working families and low-income people and turn your back on some of the poorest states in America.” 

“If we are serious about change in America, we can’t just do it in blue states,” he declared earlier in Dallas, emphasizing the need for a “50-state strategy” that leaves no voter in the dark. 

Yet Sanders’ Texas talk came with a hint of optimism as he raised the prospect of the end of Republican dominance in the state. It was a reliable applause line in Dallas and Houston, cities in the heart of counties critical to Democrats’ hopes for a bluer Texas. 

I am here to tell you that today this is a conservative Republican state, but that doesn’t mean it will be conservative Republican tomorrow,” Sanders said after taking the stage in Houston, remarking he did not want to become dizzied by the stadium-style crowd. “And with the energy I see in this room, it may be sooner than tomorrow.”

While HRC holds private fundraisers and seemingly does everything possible to piss of the press, Sanders is out there trying to connect with people.

Texas Voters No Longer to do the Two Step

For nearly 40 years, the Texas Democratic Party has conducted a two tiered method for selecting delegates to the National Convention.  Some delegates (75%) would be apportioned on the basis of the primary vote, but others (25%) would be selected in caucuses held after the polls closed on election day. But the “Texas Two-Step” tradition is officially over. The Democratic National Committee asked the state party to pick between a caucus and a primary and the primary system won out.  Texas Democrats tried to keep that system, but the DNC forced them to pick one, so they went with a primary.  Thus ends the “Texas Two-Step.”   Let the Texas Rhumba begin.

Today in Texas History – June 26

From the Annals of Democracy –  In 1928, the Democratic National Convention began in Houston at Sam Houston Hall.  It was the first nominating convention to be held in a Southern city since 1860 when the Democrats nominated Stephen Douglas.  The 1928 convention resulted in the nomination of  Gov. Alfred E. Smith of New York for President and Sen. Joseph Robinson of Arkansas for Vice President.   The Democrats were the first to nominate a Roman Catholic for President. The Texas delegation, led by Gov. Dan Moody strongly opposed Smith.  After Smith was nominated, they rallied against his anti-prohibition sentiment by fighting for a “dry” platform. Ultimately, the convention pledged “honest enforcement of the Constitution”.

Smith became the first Democrat since Reconstruction to lose more than one southern state in the general election, due to his “wet” stance, his opposition to the Ku Klux Klan, and his Catholicism.