Tag Archives: Texas Oil and Gas

Today in Texas History – December 4

From the Annals of the Wildcatters –  In 1928, Carl G. (the Big Swede) Cromwell drilled the world’s deepest oil well.  Cromwell was the drilling superintendent of the Texon Company.  Texon was working the rapidly expanding field on University of Texas land in Reagan County. He also acquired his own leases and became known as an honest, generous, free-spirited wildcatter. In association with company engineer Clayton W. Williams, Cromwell experimented in drilling deeper than the average 3,000 feet. In 1926 Williams located a site and Cromwell’s crews began work. In late November 1928, because of mounting expenses and problems, Cromwell was directed to shut down. Instead, he disregarded orders, went into hiding, and kept drilling. On December 4, the well came in at 8,525 feet.  It was the deepest oil well in the world for another three years.

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Today in Texas History – December 2

From the Annals of the Boomtowns – In 1907, citizens of Peck renamed their community Tomball in honor of former U.S. Congressman Thomas Henry Ball. Ball was strong supporter of the development of the Houston Ship Channel and a renown prohibition advocate. Tomball later rose to prominence in 1933 when drillers struck oil. The population of Tomball tripled as numerous oil and gas operators moved in and set up worker camps, and built new housing and recreation facilities.   In 1935, Humble Oil and Refining Company granted free water and natural gas to Tomball residents in exchange for drilling rights within the city limits.   Ball’s influence is still seen today as parts of the town remain dry.

Photo of Thomas Ball Statue from tripddvisor.co.uk.

Texas Miracle or Just Geography?

Forbes reports on the importance of Texas oil and gas production to the nation as a whole and begs the question if the so-called Texas miracle would have occurred in any state so fortunate as to have the oil and gas reserves that underlie Texas soil.

“The Texas Miracle” is being built on oil and natural gas. Thanks to hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) coupled with horizontal drilling, Texas crude oil production has tripled since 2010, and gas output is up 15%. Every day, Texas now produces 3.6 million barrels (b/d) of crude oil and about 22 billion cubic feet (Bcf/day) of natural gas. Texas now accounts for nearly 40% of U.S. crude output, compared to less than 20% in mid-2009, and over 30% of our natural gas. Texas is the source of ~55% of the incremental U.S. oil production since 2008 that has transformed the international market. Texas’s shale oil revolution has been launched by the Eagle Ford play in South Texas and the Permian Basin in West Texas, constituting more than two-thirds of U.S. shale output in April. Texas now yields more oil than Iran or Iraq and more natural gas than any nation except Russia and the U.S. as a whole. About half of all rigs actively exploring for or producing oil in the U.S. sit in Texas.

The importance of the Texan energy juggernaut can only increase. Texas has 11 billion barrels of proven oil reserves, 31% 0f the national total; and 90 Tcf of proven natural gas (a doubling since 2003), 26% of the national total.

Which also begs the question of why we aren’t hearing about the “North Dakota Miracle”?  Red loves Texas, but doesn’t like folks (ahem Rick Perry) taking credit for a “miracle” that they had nothing to do with.