Tag Archives: Texas Universities

Rick Perry Challenges Results of Election of Gay Student as President of Texas A&M Student Body

Proving that our former Poor Idiot Governor is still an idiot, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry has decided to weigh in on the election of a university student body president.  The student in question is Bobby Brooks who was the first openly gay student to be elected as Student Body President at Texas A&M University.  Perry, the first Aggie to serve as Texas Governor, claims that the election was stolen from Robert McIntosh – son of a major Republican fundraiser and Donald Trump supporter.  McIntosh won the election by 750 votes but was disqualified by the student election commissioner after accusations because of accusations of voter intimidation.   A&M’s judicial court — the university’s version of a student supreme court — overturned McIntosh’s disqualification, ruling there wasn’t sufficient evidence to prove he intimidated voters. The court did find, however, that McIntosh  failed to disclose financial information for glow sticks briefly featured in a campaign video and he was thus, disqualified.  Brooks, who came in second place in the election, was named the victor.

Perry, apparently not busy enough managing America’s energy needs, decided to weigh in in commentary published by the Houston Chronicle.  Perry played the race card in questioning the decision of A&M students.

The desire of the electorate is overturned, and thousands of student votes are disqualified, because of free glow sticks that appeared for eleven seconds of a months-long campaign,” Perry wrote. “Apparently glow sticks merit the same punishment as voter intimidation.

What if Mr. Brooks had been the candidate disqualified? Would the administration and the student body have allowed the first gay student body president to be voided for using charity glow sticks? Would the student body have allowed a black student body president to be disqualified on anonymous charges of voter intimidation?

Here is a suggestion, former Governor Good Hair. Mind your own frigging business. If the son of one of Trump’s sycophants can’t follow the rules, just butt out.  And if for some reason you don’t have enough to do, call up Donald Trump and tell him you need work.

Advertisements

Texas Universities – Liberal, Conservative and Somewhere Inbetween

The Houston Chronicle ranks Texas colleges and universities on a liberal/conservative scale.  Not surprisingly, Texas A&M is ranked as the most conservative institution in the state.  On the liberal side, most Aggies would have chosen UT-Austin (or TU as the disrespectful Aggies would have it).   Wrong!  UT-Austin ranks as the 7th most liberal school in the Red state.  St. Edwards University in Austin is the most liberal college in Texas.

Today in Texas History – February 17

From the Annals of Higher Education –   In 1867,  Jessie Andrews was born in Washington, Mississippi.  Andrews moved to Texas with her family in 1874 and her mother Margaret Miller Andrews operated a boarding house near the State Capitol.  Andrews graduated from Austin High.  After graduation, Andrews took the entrance exam for the University of Texas and became the first woman admitted in 1883.  She majored in German and received her B.Litt. degree in  1886.  She taught for a year at Mrs. Hood’s Seminary for Young Ladies and then joined the faculty at UT teaching German and French.  She thus became the first female graduate and first female teacher at UT.  During the First World War she became disillusioned with Germany and quit her faculty position to operate a store with her sister.  Jessie Andrews Dorm at UT is named in her honor.

Photo from the Center for American History at UT-Austin.

Today in Texas History

From the Annals of Higher Learning –  In 1876, Gov. Richard Coke  dedicated the  Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas now known as Texas A&M University.  It was the state’s first public college.   TAMU’s origins trace back to the Morrill Act of 1862.  This act provided for donation of public land to the states for the purpose of funding higher education whose “leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and mechanic arts.”  In November 1866, Texas agreed to create a college under the terms of the Morrill Act.  Actual formation did not occur until the establishment of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas by the Texas state legislature on April 17, 1871. A commission created to locate the institution accepted the offer of 2,416 acres of land from the citizens of Brazos County in 1871. Admission was limited to white males who, as required by the Morrill Act, were required to participate in military training.

Supreme Court Upholds UT-Austin’s Admission Standars

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the University of Texas at Austin’s admissions process which gives a small advantage to black and Hispanic applicants.  The decision yet again allows US colleges to use of affirmative action in their admissions procedures.   The 4-3 vote was a defeat for Sugar Land’s favorite litigant Abigail Fisher who has repeatedly claimed that she was unfairly denied admission because of her whiteness.  After being denied admission into UT-Austin in 2008, she has been relentless in her campaign to end even the slight hint of affirmative action that UT-Austin uses in an attempt to preserve some diversity on the 40 Acres.  Fisher – who did not qualify for automatic admission – claimed that black and Hispanic students who were less qualified got in over her.  But Thursday’s decision brings her case to a close. The ruling will likely have national implications in that the Court has again reaffirmed that colleges have some leeway to use affirmative action in picking their students.

Today in Texas History – June 13

From the Annals of Higher Education –  In 1920, Sul Ross State Normal College began operations. The school which is located in Alpine is now known as Sul Ross State University.  The school is named for Lawrence Sullivan Ross a Texas Governor and Confederate General.  SRSU became the cultural and educational center for remote Big Bend region of Texas.  A major draw is the Museum of the Big Bend which serves as a depository for materials which depict the multicultural society and history of the Big Bend region.  The Archives of the Big Bend in the Bryan Wildenthal Memorial Library collects documents reflecting the history and culture of the region.  SRSU offer 41 undergraduate and 27 graduate degree programs and has an enrollment of around 2000 students.

Clickbait of the Day – Houston Chronicle Ranks Texas Universities from Most to Least Conservative

Red doesn’t truck much with clickbait, but recognizes that his readers just might.  The Houston Chronicle has ranked Texas Universities from the most to least conservative.  Dallas Baptist University bests some heavy competition to rank number 1 as the most conservative college in Texas.  Not surprisingly, Texas A&M comes in at number 2 and is considered to be the largest conservative school in the U.S. – mostly by virtue of it being one of the largest colleges around.   Red doesn’t have the patience to make it through the entire list, but is guessing that the least conservative school will be either Trinity in San Antonio or Austin College in Sherman.