Tag Archives: Marshall

Today in Texas History – May 23

Bonnie & Clyde pistols sell for $504,000 - 2aHawaii

From the Annals of Crime – In 1934, notorious outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were ambushed and killed by Texas Rangers in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. The bank robbers were killed by intense gunfire that left their stolen Ford Deluxe riddled with bullet holes.

Parker met Barrow in Texas when she was 19 years old while her husband was in jail for murder. Barrow was soon sent to jail for robbery where Parker smuggled a gun that helped him escape.  He was caught and returned to jail, but when paroled in 1932, he immediately hooked up with Parker, and their multi-state crime spree began.

From 1932-1934, the couple, aided by various accomplices including Clyde’s brother Buck and simple-minded Henry Methvin, robbed a string of banks and stores in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, New Mexico and Louisiana. Although romanticized in popular culture and film, the Barrow gang were hardened criminals. It is believed that the gang was responsible for as many as 13 murders including nine police officers.

They were notorious for some close calls.  They were almost captured in 1933 during surprise raids on hideouts in Joplin and Platte City, Missouri. Buck Barrow was killed in the second raid, and his wife Blanche was arrested, but Bonnie and Clyde escaped.  Then in January 1934, they attacked the Eastham Prison Farm to help a gang member break out injuring several guards and killing one. This proved to be a crucial mistake.

Texan prison officials took the matter into hand and retained Captain Frank Hamer, a retired Texas Ranger, to track down Parker and Barrow.  Hamer found B&C in Louisiana, where Henry Methvin’s family lived.  Hamer and a group of Louisiana and Texas lawmen hid in the bushes along a country road outside Sailes, La.  Parker and Barrow would not escape this time.  As soon as they appeared, the officers opened fire, killing the couple instantly in a hail of bullets.

 

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The Passing of a Legend – Y.A. Tittle

NFL Hall of Famer and former 49er’s and Giants quarterback Y.A. Tittle passed away on Sunday.  Tittle was born and raised in Marshall. Tittle idolized his neighbor Sammy Baugh and practiced relentlessly to become a quarterback.  He starred for Marshall High leading them to an undefeated season his senior year.   He chose LSU over Texas for his college where he set career records that were not broken until the 1970’s.  As a junior in 1946, Tittle led his team to the Cotton Bowl.  The notorious game against Arkansas was played in freezing conditions on an icy field and became known as the Ice Bowl after ending in a 0-0 tie.

Tittle began his pro career for the Baltimore Colts in the All-American Football Conference in 1948.  When that club folded, he was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers where he was named All-Pro and played in four Pro Bowl games.

In 1961, the 34-year old Tittle was traded to the New York Giants whom he led to three consecutive NFL Championship games.  The Giants lost all three, but by then Tittle was a folk hero to Giants fans.

In 17 seasons, YAT completed 2,427 out of 4,395 passes for 33,070 yards and 242 touchdowns and another 39 rushing TDs.  The only blemish on his statistical record are his 248 career interceptions.

Photo of Y.A. Tittle the first professional football player to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated.  November 22, 1954

Today in Texas History – February 24

From the Annals of the Police State – In 1969, approximately 100 Texas Rangers, local lawmen, and state police descended on Wiley College in a wild overreaction to a series of nonviolent student demonstrations on the campus.  Wiley, in Marshall, is the oldest black college west of the Mississippi River.  The students were demonstrating over faculty hiring practices, primitive dormitory facilities, and cutbacks in the intercollegiate athletic program. The police undertook a massive search for concealed weapons in the dorms – something the right-wing would now have to condemn but undoubtedly condoned because black students were the ones targeted.  The search turned up nothing and only resulted in the campus being closed for several weeks.  The demonstrations continued after the police raid and ultimately resulted in the school administration’s decision to improve living conditions on campus.