Tag Archives: Mexico

Red’s World Cup Update

Red’s pre-tournament  favorites Mexico, Spain, Portugal and Argentina seem to be headed in different directions.

Spain and Portugal are likely moving on with 4 points each and playing Morocco and Iran respectively in the third game of group play.  But neither side has impressed so far.  Red calls Spain and Portugal mediocre in action to date.  Each side needs a three goal outburst against the lesser competition.  Red views Portugal as more likely to come up with a big game.

Any time you beat the reigning world champion, things are looking up.  Mexico is certainly looking that way and a win over Sweden (make that S. Korea)  tomorrow (not a given by any means) would all but assure an entry into the Round of 16 for El Tri and add to the swagger that comes with beating Deutschland.   Look for more fireworks from Mexico’s powerful frontline and rising star Hirving Lozano and more solid keeping from Memo Ochoa.

And alas, Los Albicelestes are wondering where the bus came from that has run them over and drug them a kilometer down the road in this WC.  A total ass-whomping by Croatia has put Argentina in a serious bind.  There is a narrow path to the knock-out rounds but Messi and Co. no longer control their own fate.   SB Nation has the scoop on Argentina’s chances.

  1. Iceland ties or loses to Nigeria tomorrow.

  2. Croatia then needs to beat or tie Iceland.

  3. Argentina needs to beat Nigeria.

All three of those things happening will allow Argentina to advance.

If Iceland beats Nigeria tomorrow, there is still an outside chance that Argentina could sneak in, but for that to happen it would rely on them beating Nigeria and then Iceland losing to Croatia, and then it would come down to a tiebreaker, since both teams would be on four points.

Goal difference would decide it at that point, and if goal difference is the same, then it will go to yellow cards, of which Argentina has more than a few.  If none of the above happens, Argentina is eliminated.

This looks like the end for Argentina as a serious world power for at least a couple of years.  Maybe they come back in Copa America next year – but maybe not.

Other teams to watch (besides the obvious favorites to move on) include – Croatia, Senegal, Japan and Denmark.  Meanwhile, Red is sort of wishing he had gotten on the Uruguay bandwagon – but he just doesn’t like Suarez or Cavani (the Robbins of South America).

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A Texan Travels to Mexico

Red is back from a short trip to Mexico City.  Here are a few observations:

  1.   Every hostess in Mexico City must wear her hair pulled back.
  2.   The streets and highways in Mexico City are in better condition than the roads in most Texas cities.  Sad.
  3. Roads are frequently closed/barricaded for mysterious reasons.
  4. You must find a trendy restaurant – (e.g. Sonora Prime Grill) arrive at 2:30 on a weekday and sit back and watch the show for a couple of hours.
  5. If you are looking for lunch before 1:00 pm – forget it.  However, a late breakfast is available everywhere.
  6. The Ballet Folklorico de Mexico is a must see and great bargain for the price.
  7. You will be surprised by something – Red arrived in time for the massive Colores de Primevera market set up in huge tents on the Zocalo – flowers, plants, herbs, food (especially chocolate and mole), therapy, clothes, pottery, trinkets, etc.  When he was leaving they were setting up the massive TV screens for the World Cup on the Zocalo.
  8. There are always massive amounts of police in the city center.  They appeared poised to quell any disturbances.  There do not appear to be any disturbances.
  9. Retail is king in Mexico City.  There are shops on every block that isn’t fully occupied by a church or a government office.
  10. There are a number of great museums that are must-sees such as the Archelogical Museum in Chapultepec, the Castillo de Chapultepec, the Museum of Modern Art, etc.  But you should find some of the less well-known museums.  Red found an exhibition at the former Palace of Iturbide now the  “Palacio de Cultura Banamex” featuring equestrian works from the Americas – paintings, etchings, photographs, sculptures, saddles, spurs, bridles, folk art, etc.  – a truly fabulous exhibit for the horse lover.

 

 

Today in Texas History – March 27

From the Annals of the Revolution –   In 1836, 340 Texians under the command of Col. James Fannin  were executed by firing squad at La Bahia in  Goliad.  As rebels and “perfidious foreigners” according to Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, El Presidente had decreed that all those in arms against the Mexican government were to be treated as traitors.  Most of the rebels executed  had been trying to escape the determined onslaught of Mexican forces under Gen. Jose de Urrea.  However, in fleeing the Texians were surrounded on open ground without adequate supplies largely because of Fannin’s incompetence as a military leader.  After the two-day Battle of Coleto, the men voted  to surrender thinking they would be exiled to the U.S.  Other prisoners had been captured in minor skirmishes with Urrea’s forces.   After capture, Urrea, who had previously executed other prisoners he considered to be mercenaries, pleaded for clemency – but Santa Anna ordered the mass execution when Urrea was away from Goliad.  The “Goliad Massacre” was carried out by Lt. Colonel José Nicolás de la Portilla – whose enthusiasm for the deadly work has been debated by historians.  On Palm Sunday, Portilla had between 425 and 445 Texians marched out of the Mission  in three columns on the Bexar Road, San Patricio Road, and the Victoria Road, between two rows of Mexican soldiers.  The Texians  were shot point blank, survivors were were hunted down and killed by gunfire, bayonet, or lance.  About 30 men escaped by feigning death and another 20 or so were granted clemency to act as doctors, workers and interpreters.  Another 75 men were marched to Matamoros for imprisonment.  Remember Goliad – along with Remember the Alamo – became the rallying cry for the remaining Texian Army.

Today in Texas History – March 8

The Alamo and Goliad. - ppt video online download

From the Annals of the Revolution – In 1836, Col. James W. Fannin raised a flag over the mission at La Bahia in Goliad with the words “Liberty or Death”.  Fannin, now generally regarded as an inept commander who had lost the confidence of his men, was prophetic in his announcement.  Unfortunately for Fannin and his men it would by “Death.”  In fairness to Fannin, he was facing Mexican General Jose de Urrea – by far the best of the Mexican commanders. If Urrea had been in command during the revolution, it is very likely to have been easily suppressed.  Urrea’s forces were never defeated in battle during the war and remained ready to fight after the Battle of San Jacinto. Fannin was originally ordered by Sam Houston to relieve the Alamo and then later ordered to retreat to Victoria.  He delayed in his retreat and during that action he was cornered on open ground with limited supplies and forced to surrender.  Held back at Goliad, Fannin and his men were massacred on the orders of Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna.  Urrea strongly objected to executing prisoners of war, but the order was carried out by subordinates.  Fannin was among the last to be shot.

Today in Texas History – March 2

Texas Independence Day - Wikipedia

From the Annals of the Revolution – In 1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico.  Following a meeting on March 1 at Washington-on-the-Brazos of delegates from the seventeen Mexican municipalities of Texas and the settlement of Pecan Point, George C. Childress and a committee of five were tasked with preparing a resolution calling for independence.  In the early morning hours of March 2, the convention voted unanimously to accept the resolution prepared by the committee.  Fifty-eight members of the delegation signed the document announcing to the world that Texas had declared itself to be the independent Republic of Texas.   Less than two months later after the Battle of San Jacinto, actual independence was secured.  The Republic would last only about 10 years until Texas was annexed by the United States.

Today in Texas History – February 22

Image result for adams onis treaty

From the Annals of the Border – In 1819, U.S. Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and Spanish foreign minister Luis de Onis y Gonzalez-Vara signed the Adams-Onis Treaty also known as the Florida Treaty. Spain ceded Florida to the U.S. in exchange for settling the long simmering boundary dispute between the U.S. and New Spain.  Spain was frankly interested in jettisoning Florida as it was already overwhelmed with wars for independence in South America and periodic upheaval what was soon to be Mexico.  The treaty set the U.S./New Spain boundary at the Sabine River and on through the great plains and Rocky Mountains following the Red River and Arkansas River – basically according to the terms of the Louisiana Purchase –  and then on west to the Pacific Ocean along the 42nd Parallel.  The U.S. renounced any claims to Texas and agreed to pay residents’ claims against the Spanish government up to a total of $5,000,000.  The treaty was short-lived as Mexico was granted independence from Spain in 1821.  Mexico ratified the boundaries of AO Treaty by agreeing to the Treaty of Limits in 1828.  The boundary stood until the Texas Revolution and the later the Mexican-American War.

Today in Texas History – October 3

From the Annals of the Republic –   In 1842, President Sam Houston ordered Alexander Somervell to organize the militia and volunteers and invade Mexico.  The call for volunteers was answered by about 700 men who were eager to avenge punitive raids made by Mexico earlier that year.  The expedition left San Antonio on November 25 capturing Laredo on December 8.   The expedition quickly began to break up as approximately 185 returned home.  Somervell continued on and with a little over 500 men seized Guerrero.   By December 19, Somervell realized that further action would likely be disastrous and ordered his men to disband and return home by way of Gonzales.  A large contingent of 308 men disobeyed the order.  This group commanded by William S. Fisher continued to Mexico on the predictably ill-fated Mier Expedition.  That raid ended with the capture of the majority of the expedition and execution of seventeen men.