Tag Archives: Cotton Bowl

Today in Texas History December 8

From the Annals of Intercollegiate Athletics –  In 1914, the Southwest Intercollegiate Athletic Conference was formed at a meeting at the Rice Hotel in Houston.  The name was changed to the Southwest Conference in 1925 and it existed as a major college conference until its dissolution in 1996.   The inaugural members were Arkansas, Rice, Baylor, Oklahoma, Oklahoma A&M, Southwestern, Texas A&M and Texas. Southwestern was a member for only one year and the Oklahoma schools were gone in less than a decade.  Major additions were SMU in 1918, TCU in 1923, Texas Tech in 1956 and Houston in 1972.  With the inception of the Cotton Bowl Classic at Fair Park in Dallas, the SWC Champion was the host team and the CBC featured several games that determined the then “Mythical” National Champion.

The death came quickly with Arkansas leaving in 1991 and Texas, A&M, Tech and Baylor breaking off to join the schools of the Big 8 in forming the Big 12 (now featuring 10 schools).

Red has always blamed the break up of the SWC on the scandalous Pony Express program at SMU largely orchestrated by former Poor Idiot Governor Bill Clements – a notorious scuzzbag of a businessman. After getting a death penalty sanction from the NCAA in 1987, SMU hung around the neck of the SWC like a dead chicken.  Red believes that if the conference had had the juevos to kick out the Mustangs and attempt to get a good replacement (like LSU or Oklahoma) the conference would be alive and well today.  Red suspects the specter of Clements kept that from happening.  Thanks for nothing Bill!

Red always thought that the SWC logo made it look like Texas had wings.

Today in Texas History – October 24

Image result for texas stadium postcard

From the Annals of the Builders –  In 1971,Texas Stadium officially opened in Irving with the Cowboys beating the New England Patriots 44-21.

The Cowboys’ original home was the Cotton Bowl at Fair Park in Dallas.  However, by the late 1960’s, owner Clint Murchison, Jr. was concerned about that area of Dallas and believed that Cowboys’ fans should not have to experience any less than pleasant experience on their way to games. CMJ attempted to persuade Dallas to build a new downtown stadium as part of a municipal bond package, but failed to get any traction for the idea.

Murchison was a visionary and planned for a new stadium with sky boxes for elite patrons that would provide a new revenue source that would not have to be shared with other owners.  He also came up with the idea of selling bonds (now called personal seat licenses) as a prerequisite to purchasing season tickets and as a way to finance construction of a new stadium to be located in nearby Irving.

The somewhat pretentiously named Texas Stadium was the first football only stadium built for an NFL team.  NFL teams had long-played in baseball parks or stadiums such as the Cotton Bowl original intended for college football games.  Then came a wave of multi-purpose stadiums such as the Astrodome.  But Texas Stadium with its iconic hole in the roof (really an accident as the stadium was supposed to have a retractable roof) set the mark for NFL teams who now aspired to controlling their own venue.  In the future, local taxpayers would bear the brunt of paying for the billionaires playgrounds.

 

Texas Bowl Games or More Correctly, Bowl Games to be Played in Texas

The College football Bowl schedule for Texas is now set.  In addition to the national semi-final playoff game between Alabama and Michigan State at JerryWorld in Arlington (aka the Goodyear Cotton Bowl) on December 31, the overcrowded Bowl schedule includes the following soon to be classics:

December 26 –

Hyundai Sun Bowl at the Sun Bowl Stadium in El Paso: Miami vs. Washington State  – featuring the return of former Texas Tech coach Mike Leach to Texas with the resurgent Cougars. 1 pm on CBS.

Zaxby’s Heart of Dallas Bowl at the Cotton Bowl Stadim in Dallas: Washington vs. Southern Miss  – just to make sure that all major college teams from Washington get to play in Texas this year. 1:20 pm on ESPN.  They didn’t want anyone to miss the kickoff at the Sun Bowl.

December 29

Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl at Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth: California vs. Air Force – a game sure to draw in thousands of fans, as in about 2000.  1 pm on ESPN

AdvoCare V100 Texas Bowl at NRG Stadium in Houston: LSU vs. Texas Tech –  just to disappoint those looking for a Texas Tech/Texas A&M matchup8 p.m. on ESPN.

January 2

Valero Alamo Bowl at the AlamoDome in San Antonio: Oregon vs. TCU – which actually looks to be one of the more entertaining games on the undercard. 5:45 p.m. on ESPN.

In addition, several Texas teams will travel outside of the great state to end their seasons:

 Baylor will face North Carolina in the Russell Athletic Bowl at the Orlando Citrus Bowl in Orlando, Florida on Dec. 29 (4:30 p.m. on ESPN)

Texas A&M will match up against Louisville in the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl at Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee on December 30 (6:00 pm on ESPN).

Houston will try to finish 13-1 against Florida State in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia on December 31 (11:00 a.m. on ESPN).

All time CST of course.  Red will have his predictions later.

 

 

 

 

Today in Texas History – October 26

From the Annals of the State Fair –  In 1930, the first football game was played at the Cotton Bowl at the Fair Park in Dallas.  SMU beat Indiana 27-0 to record the first win in the newly constructed stadium.  The 46,000-seat stadium was on the site of the former 15,000 seat Fair Park Football Stadium.  For more than 75 years, the stadium was the site of its namesake Cotton Bowl Classic which pitted the Southwest Conference champion against another highly ranked team on New Year’s Day.  The Cotton Bowl was the site of several of the “mythical” national championship games including UT’s victory over Notre Dame to claim the title in 1969.  The stadium was renovated extensively in 1949 increasing seating to 75,504. The Cotton Bowl was home to the short-lived Dallas Texans of the NFL in 1952, the Dallas Texans (now the Kansas City Chiefs) of the AFL from 1960 to 1962, and the Dallas Cowboys from 1960 to 1970. The stadium was renovated again in 1994 in preparation for World Cup games.  The venerable stadium was renovated again in the last decade to further increase its capacity.  The Cotton Bowl still hosts the annual Texas-OU game and the Ticket City Bowl.